healmematty:

the pink has honestly changed me

healmematty:

the pink has honestly changed me

tagged: +pink shirt  +matty 
In contexts in which food is scarce, being fat signals access to limited resources. Yet in the contemporary rich nations, in which there is an abundance of cheap sources of calories, the wealthiest— who still consume far more per capita than average citizens— are now often the thinnest. Despite this, fat bodies continue to be read as the embodiment of greed and overconsumption. In fact, fat people’s relative lack of power (both because they are less likely to be wealthy and because fatness is independently stigmatizing) makes them an easy target.
Abigail C. Saguy, What’s Wrong with Fat? (via socio-logic) ←

tagged: +gif  +clouds 

golfdad1992:

Isn’t amazing how people don’t give a shit about misogyny until they can accuse muslims of it in order to justify their islamaphobia?

sosuperawesome:

Mini paintings on cedar by Cathy McMurray on Etsy

hazardgirl:

I like how he is wildly pregnant

yet takes a pregnancy test

and is surprised by the results

then he hugs a flower

well ok

im in me mums cah

puppy95:

golau-galon:

puppy95:

broom broom

get out me cah :)

awh :(

pybooty:

Coming Out Simulator 2014 - a half-true game about half-truths

Coming Out Simulator is exactly what it says it is. It’s a free-to-play conversation simulator based on/inspired by the personal story of coming out of its creator, Nicky Case.

There’s no easy answer in Coming Out Simulator, no optimal ending to be achieved if you collect the requisite amount of points. Case based the game off a pivotal moment in his own life as a teenager. And just like in real life, the moment of “coming out” in this game is traumatic no matter which way the player chooses to approach it.

Ultimately, it’s liberating as well. But that’s not what the brunt of the experience playing Coming Out Simulator is actually like. […] There’s power in exploring a fantasy like the one in Mass Effect 3, but there’s also power in being reminded that “coming out” the way one does in that game is a fantasy, and a pretty far-fetched one for many people who faced far more difficult challenges when they actually came out.

Coming Out Simulator is a game about that second experience. It’s a painful one. But it’s also a necessary one, that I think more people who’ve never had to struggle with their own sexual identity should see for themselves. 

this game made me cry omfg

nisfi:

i love how racists say they have an “unpopular opinion” like um no actually your opinion is so popular that there is an entire structure of oppression based around it that controls the entire country cool story

eggnoginfused:

I think the creepiest thing in the world is what society has done to the word “daddy”

tagged: +yees 
The depth of isolation in the ghetto is also evident in black speech patterns, which have evolved steadily away from Standard American English. Because of their intense social isolation, many ghetto residents have come to speak a language that is increasingly remote from that spoken by American whites. Black street speech, or more formally, Black English Vernacular, has its roots in the West Indian creole and Scots-Irish dialects of the eighteenth century. As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.

Douglas Massey and Nancy A. Denton, Chapter 6: “The Perpetuation of the Underclass,” p. 162 (American apartheid: segregation and the making of the underclass)

As linguists have shown, it is by no means a “degenerate,” or “illogical” version of Standard American English; rather, it constitutes a complex, rich, and expressive language in its own right, with a consistent grammar, pronunciation, and lexicon all its own.

(via deux-zero-deux)


bellaisbadatmath:

fleurlungs:

“Life’s too short to drink crappy coffee and cry over boys who don’t care.”

— Matty Healy (The 1975)

image